Input Components

An Input component displays an input, or a dropdown list, a list of radio buttons, etc. Such components allow to edit a record property, and are common in the <Edit>, <Create>, and <Filter> views.

// in src/posts.js
import React from 'react';
import { Edit, SimpleForm, ReferenceInput, SelectInput, TextInput, required } from 'react-admin';

export const PostEdit = (props) => (
    <Edit title={<PostTitle />} {...props}>
        <SimpleForm>
            <TextInput disabled source="id" />
            <ReferenceInput label="User" source="userId" reference="users" validate={[required()]}>
                <SelectInput optionText="name" />
            </ReferenceInput>
            <TextInput source="title" label="Post title" validate={[required()]} />
            <TextInput multiline source="body" initialValue="Lorem Ipsum" />
        </SimpleForm>
    </Edit>
);

Common Input Props

All input components accept the following props:

  • source: Property name of your entity to view/edit. This attribute is required.
  • label: Used as input label. Defaults to the humanized source when omitted.
  • validate: Validation rules for the current property. See the Validation Documentation for details.
  • helperText: Text to be displayed under the input.
  • fullWidth: If true, the input will expand to fill the form width. Defaults to false.
<TextInput source="zb_title" label="Title" initialValue="Foo" />

React-admin uses react-final-form to control form inputs. Each input component also accepts all react-final-form FieldProps, including:

  • initialValue: Value to be set when the property is null or undefined.
  • format: A function that takes the value from the form values and the name of the field and formats the value to give to the input. See the Transforming Input Value section.
  • parse: A function that takes the value from the input and name of the field and converts the value into the value you want stored as this field’s value in the form. See the Transforming Input Value section.

Additional props are passed down to the underlying component (usually a material-ui component). For instance, when setting the className prop on a TextInput component, the underlying material-ui <TextField> receives it, and renders with custom styles. You can also set the underlying component variant and margin that way.

Tip: If you edit a record with a complex structure, you can use a path as the source parameter. For instance, if the API returns the following ‘book’ record:

{
    id: 1234,
    title: 'War and Peace',
    author: {
        firstName: 'Leo',
        lastName: 'Tolstoi'
    }
}

Then you can display a text input to edit the author first name as follows:

<TextInput source="author.firstName" />

Tip: If your interface has to support multiple languages, don’t use the label prop, and put the localized labels in a dictionary instead. See the Translation documentation for details.

Tip: For compatibility reasons, input components also accept the defaultValue prop - which is simply copied as the initialValue prop.

<ArrayInput>

To edit arrays of data embedded inside a record, <ArrayInput> creates a list of sub-forms.

import { ArrayInput, SimpleFormIterator, DateInput, TextInput } from 'react-admin';

<ArrayInput source="backlinks">
    <SimpleFormIterator>
        <DateInput source="date" />
        <TextInput source="url" />
    </SimpleFormIterator>
</ArrayInput>

ArrayInput

<ArrayInput> allows editing of embedded arrays, like the backlinks field in the following post record:

{
  id: 123,
  backlinks: [
        {
            date: '2012-08-10T00:00:00.000Z',
            url: 'http://example.com/foo/bar.html',
        },
        {
            date: '2012-08-14T00:00:00.000Z',
            url: 'https://blog.johndoe.com/2012/08/12/foobar.html',
        }
   ]
}

<ArrayInput> expects a single child, which must be a form iterator component. A form iterator is a component accepting a fields object as passed by react-final-form-array, and defining a layout for an array of fields. For instance, the <SimpleFormIterator> component displays an array of fields in an unordered list (<ul>), one sub-form by list item (<li>). It also provides controls for adding and removing a sub-record (a backlink in this example).

You can pass disableAdd and disableRemove as props of SimpleFormIterator, to disable ADD and REMOVE button respectively. Default value of both is false.

import { ArrayInput, SimpleFormIterator, DateInput, TextInput } from 'react-admin';

<ArrayInput source="backlinks">
    <SimpleFormIterator disableRemove >
        <DateInput source="date" />
        <TextInput source="url" />
    </SimpleFormIterator>
</ArrayInput>

<ArrayInput> also accepts the common input props.

<AutocompleteInput>

To let users choose a value in a list using a dropdown with autocompletion, use <AutocompleteInput>. It renders using downshift and a fuzzySearch filter. Set the choices attribute to determine the options list (with id, name tuples).

import { AutocompleteInput } from 'react-admin';

<AutocompleteInput source="category" choices={[
    { id: 'programming', name: 'Programming' },
    { id: 'lifestyle', name: 'Lifestyle' },
    { id: 'photography', name: 'Photography' },
]} />

You can also customize the properties to use for the option name and value, thanks to the optionText and optionValue attributes:

const choices = [
    { _id: 123, full_name: 'Leo Tolstoi', sex: 'M' },
    { _id: 456, full_name: 'Jane Austen', sex: 'F' },
];
<AutocompleteInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText="full_name" optionValue="_id" />

optionText also accepts a function, so you can shape the option text at will:

const choices = [
   { id: 123, first_name: 'Leo', last_name: 'Tolstoi' },
   { id: 456, first_name: 'Jane', last_name: 'Austen' },
];
const optionRenderer = choice => `${choice.first_name} ${choice.last_name}`;
<AutocompleteInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText={optionRenderer} />

The choices are translated by default, so you can use translation identifiers as choices:

const choices = [
   { id: 'M', name: 'myroot.gender.male' },
   { id: 'F', name: 'myroot.gender.female' },
];

However, in some cases (e.g. inside a <ReferenceInput>), you may not want the choice to be translated. In that case, set the translateChoice prop to false.

<AutocompleteInput source="gender" choices={choices} translateChoice={false}/>

If you want to limit the initial choices shown to the current value only, you can set the limitChoicesToValue prop.

When dealing with a large amount of choices you may need to limit the number of suggestions that are rendered in order to maintain usable performance. The shouldRenderSuggestions is an optional prop that allows you to set conditions on when to render suggestions. An easy way to improve performance would be to skip rendering until the user has entered 2 or 3 characters in the search box. This lowers the result set significantly, and might be all you need (depending on your data set). Ex. <AutocompleteInput shouldRenderSuggestions={(val) => { return val.trim().length > 2 }} /> would not render any suggestions until the 3rd character was entered. This prop is passed to the underlying react-autosuggest component and is documented here.

<AutocompleteInput> renders a material-ui <TextField> component. Use the options attribute to override any of the <TextField> attributes:

<AutocompleteInput source="category" options={{
    color: 'secondary',
}} />

Tip: If you want to populate the choices attribute with a list of related records, you should decorate <AutocompleteInput> with <ReferenceInput>, and leave the choices empty:

import { AutocompleteInput, ReferenceInput } from 'react-admin';

<ReferenceInput label="Post" source="post_id" reference="posts">
    <AutocompleteInput optionText="title" />
</ReferenceInput>

Lastly, would you need to override the props of the suggestions container (a Popper element), you can specify them using the options.suggestionsContainerProps. For example:

<AutocompleteInput source="category" options={{
    suggestionsContainerProps: {
        disablePortal: true,
}}} />

Tip: <AutocompleteInput> is a stateless component, so it only allows to filter the list of choices, not to extend it. If you need to populate the list of choices based on the result from a fetch call (and if <ReferenceInput> doesn’t cover your need), you’ll have to write your own Input component based on material-ui <AutoComplete> component.

Properties

Prop Required Type Default Description
allowEmpty Optional boolean false If false and the searchText typed did not match any suggestion, the searchText will revert to the current value when the field is blurred. If true and the searchText is set to '' then the field will set the input value to null.
choices Required Object[] - List of items to autosuggest
emptyValue Optional anything null The value to use for the empty element
emptyText Optional string ’’ The text to use for the empty element
matchSuggestion Optional Function - Required if optionText is a React element. Function returning a boolean indicating whether a choice matches the filter. (filter, choice) => boolean
optionText Optional string | Function name Fieldname of record to display in the suggestion item or function which accepts the correct record as argument ((record)=> {string})
optionValue Optional string id Fieldname of record containing the value to use as input value
setFilter Optional Function null A callback to inform the searchText has changed and new choices can be retrieved based on this searchText. Signature searchText => void. This function is automatically setup when using ReferenceInput.
shouldRenderSuggestions Optional Function () => true A function that returns a boolean to determine whether or not suggestions are rendered. Use this when working with large collections of data to improve performance and user experience. This function is passed into the underlying react-autosuggest component. Ex.(value) => value.trim() > 2

<AutocompleteInput> also accepts the common input props.

<AutocompleteArrayInput>

To let users choose multiple values in a list using a dropdown with autocompletion, use <AutocompleteArrayInput>. It renders using downshift and a fuzzySearch filter. Set the choices attribute to determine the options list (with id, name tuples).

import { AutocompleteArrayInput } from 'react-admin';

<AutocompleteArrayInput source="category" choices={[
    { id: 'programming', name: 'Programming' },
    { id: 'lifestyle', name: 'Lifestyle' },
    { id: 'photography', name: 'Photography' },
]} />

You can also customize the properties to use for the option name and value, thanks to the optionText and optionValue attributes:

const choices = [
    { _id: 123, full_name: 'Leo Tolstoi', sex: 'M' },
    { _id: 456, full_name: 'Jane Austen', sex: 'F' },
];
<AutocompleteArrayInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText="full_name" optionValue="_id" />

optionText also accepts a function, so you can shape the option text at will:

const choices = [
   { id: 123, first_name: 'Leo', last_name: 'Tolstoi' },
   { id: 456, first_name: 'Jane', last_name: 'Austen' },
];
const optionRenderer = choice => `${choice.first_name} ${choice.last_name}`;
<AutocompleteArrayInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText={optionRenderer} />

The choices are translated by default, so you can use translation identifiers as choices:

const choices = [
   { id: 'M', name: 'myroot.gender.male' },
   { id: 'F', name: 'myroot.gender.female' },
];

However, in some cases (e.g. inside a <ReferenceInput>), you may not want the choice to be translated. In that case, set the translateChoice prop to false.

<AutocompleteArrayInput source="gender" choices={choices} translateChoice={false}/>

When dealing with a large amount of choices you may need to limit the number of suggestions that are rendered in order to maintain usable performance. The shouldRenderSuggestions is an optional prop that allows you to set conditions on when to render suggestions. An easy way to improve performance would be to skip rendering until the user has entered 2 or 3 characters in the search box. This lowers the result set significantly, and might be all you need (depending on your data set). Ex. <AutocompleteArrayInput shouldRenderSuggestions={(val) => { return val.trim().length > 2 }} /> would not render any suggestions until the 3rd character was entered. This prop is passed to the underlying react-autosuggest component and is documented here.

Lastly, <AutocompleteArrayInput> renders a material-ui <TextField> component. Use the options attribute to override any of the <TextField> attributes:

<AutocompleteArrayInput source="category" options={{
    color: 'secondary',
}} />

Tip: Like many other inputs, <AutocompleteArrayInput> accept a fullWidth prop. Tip: If you want to populate the choices attribute with a list of related records, you should decorate <AutocompleteArrayInput> with <ReferenceArrayInput>, and leave the choices empty:

import { AutocompleteArrayInput, ReferenceArrayInput } from 'react-admin';

<ReferenceArrayInput label="Tags" reference="tags" source="tags">
    <AutocompleteArrayInput />
</ReferenceArrayInput>

If you need to override the props of the suggestions container (a Popper element), you can specify them using the options.suggestionsContainerProps. For example:

<AutocompleteArrayInput source="category" options={{
    suggestionsContainerProps: {
        disablePortal: true,
}}} />

Tip: <ReferenceArrayInput> is a stateless component, so it only allows to filter the list of choices, not to extend it. If you need to populate the list of choices based on the result from a fetch call (and if <ReferenceArrayInput> doesn’t cover your need), you’ll have to write your own Input component based on material-ui-chip-input.

Tip: React-admin’s <AutocompleteInput> has only a capital A, while material-ui’s <AutoComplete> has a capital A and a capital C. Don’t mix up the components!

Properties

Prop Required Type Default Description
choices Required Object[] - List of items to autosuggest
matchSuggestion Optional Function - Required if optionText is a React element. Function returning a boolean indicating whether a choice matches the filter. (filter, choice) => boolean
optionValue Optional string id Fieldname of record containing the value to use as input value
optionText Optional string | Function name Fieldname of record to display in the suggestion item or function which accepts the current record as argument ((record)=> {string})
setFilter Optional Function null A callback to inform the searchText has changed and new choices can be retrieved based on this searchText. Signature searchText => void. This function is automatically setup when using ReferenceInput.
shouldRenderSuggestions Optional Function () => true A function that returns a boolean to determine whether or not suggestions are rendered. Use this when working with large collections of data to improve performance and user experience. This function is passed into the underlying react-autosuggest component. Ex.(value) => value.trim() > 2
source Required string - Name of field to edit, its type should match the type retrieved from optionValue
suggestionLimit Optional Number null Limits the numbers of suggestions that are shown in the dropdown list

<AutocompleteArrayInput> also accepts the common input props.

<BooleanInput> and <NullableBooleanInput>

<BooleanInput /> is a toggle button allowing you to attribute a true or false value to a record field.

import { BooleanInput } from 'react-admin';

<BooleanInput label="Commentable" source="commentable" />

BooleanInput

This input does not handle null values. You would need the <NullableBooleanInput /> component if you have to handle non-set booleans.

You can use the options prop to pass any option supported by the Material UI Switch components. For example, here’s how to set a custom checked icon:

import { BooleanInput } from 'react-admin';
import FavoriteIcon from '@material-ui/icons/Favorite';

<BooleanInput
    source="favorite"
    options={{
        checkedIcon: <FavoriteIcon />,
    }}
/>

CustomBooleanInputCheckIcon

Refer to Material UI Switch documentation for more details.

<NullableBooleanInput /> renders as a dropdown list, allowing to choose between true, false, and null values.

import { NullableBooleanInput } from 'react-admin';

<NullableBooleanInput label="Commentable" source="commentable" />

NullableBooleanInput

<BooleanInput> and <NullableBooleanInput> also accepts the common input props.

<CheckboxGroupInput>

If you want to let the user choose multiple values among a list of possible values by showing them all, <CheckboxGroupInput> is the right component. Set the choices attribute to determine the options (with id, name tuples):

import { CheckboxGroupInput } from 'react-admin';

<CheckboxGroupInput source="category" choices={[
    { id: 'programming', name: 'Programming' },
    { id: 'lifestyle', name: 'Lifestyle' },
    { id: 'photography', name: 'Photography' },
]} />

CheckboxGroupInput

You can also customize the properties to use for the option name and value, thanks to the optionText and optionValue attributes:

const choices = [
    { _id: 123, full_name: 'Leo Tolstoi', sex: 'M' },
    { _id: 456, full_name: 'Jane Austen', sex: 'F' },
];
<CheckboxGroupInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText="full_name" optionValue="_id" />

optionText also accepts a function, so you can shape the option text at will:

const choices = [
   { id: 123, first_name: 'Leo', last_name: 'Tolstoi' },
   { id: 456, first_name: 'Jane', last_name: 'Austen' },
];
const optionRenderer = choice => `${choice.first_name} ${choice.last_name}`;
<CheckboxGroupInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText={optionRenderer} />

optionText also accepts a React Element, that will be cloned and receive the related choice as the record prop. You can use Field components there.

const choices = [
   { id: 123, first_name: 'Leo', last_name: 'Tolstoi' },
   { id: 456, first_name: 'Jane', last_name: 'Austen' },
];
const FullNameField = ({ record }) => <span>{record.first_name} {record.last_name}</span>;
<CheckboxGroupInput source="gender" choices={choices} optionText={<FullNameField />}/>

The choices are translated by default, so you can use translation identifiers as choices:

const choices = [
    { id: 'programming', name: 'myroot.category.programming' },
    { id: 'lifestyle', name: 'myroot.category.lifestyle' },
    { id: 'photography', name: 'myroot.category.photography' },
];

However, in some cases (e.g. inside a <ReferenceInput>), you may not want the choice to be translated. In that case, set the translateChoice prop to false.

<CheckboxGroupInput source="gender" choices={choices} translateChoice={false}/>

Lastly, use the options attribute if you want to override any of Material UI’s <Checkbox> attributes:

import { FavoriteBorder, Favorite } from '@material-ui/icons';

<CheckboxGroupInput source="category" options={{
    icon: <FavoriteBorder />,
    checkedIcon: <Favorite />
}} />

Properties

Prop Type Default Description  
choices Required Object[] - List of choices
optionText Optional string | Function name Fieldname of record to display in the suggestion item or function which accepts the correct record as argument ((record)=> {string})
optionValue Optional string id Fieldname of record containing the value to use as input value
row boolean true Display group of elements in a compact row.  

Refer to Material UI Checkbox documentation for more details.

<CheckboxGroupInput> also accepts the common input props.

<DateInput>

Ideal for editing dates, <DateInput> renders an HTML <input type="date"> element, that most browsers display as a standard Date Picker. That means the appearance of <DateInput> depends on the browser, and falls back to a text input on Safari. The date formatting in this input depends on the user’s locale.

import { DateInput } from 'react-admin';

<DateInput source="published_at" />

DateInput

<DateInput> also accepts the common input props.

Tip: For a material-ui styled <DateInput> component, check out vascofg/react-admin-date-inputs.

<DateTimeInput>

An input for editing dates with time. <DateTimeInput> renders a standard browser Date and Time Picker, so the appearance depends on the browser (and falls back to a text input on safari).

import { DateTimeInput } from 'react-admin';

<DateTimeInput source="published_at" />

<DateTimeInput> also accepts the common input props.

Tip: For a material-ui styled <DateTimeInput> component, check out vascofg/react-admin-date-inputs.

<ImageInput>

<ImageInput> allows to upload some pictures using react-dropzone.

ImageInput

Previews are enabled using <ImageInput> children, as following:

<ImageInput source="pictures" label="Related pictures" accept="image/*">
    <ImageField source="src" title="title" />
</ImageInput>

Writing a custom field component for displaying the current value(s) is easy: it’s a standard field.

When receiving new files, ImageInput will add a rawFile property to the object passed as the record prop of children. This rawFile is the File instance of the newly added file. This can be useful to display information about size or mimetype inside a custom field.

The ImageInput component accepts an options prop, allowing to set the react-dropzone properties. However, some of these props must be passed directly to ImageInput: maxSize, minSize, multiple.

If the default Dropzone label doesn’t fit with your need, you can pass a placeholder prop to overwrite it. The value can be anything React can render (PropTypes.node):

<ImageInput source="pictures" label="Related pictures" accept="image/*" placeholder={<p>Drop your file here</p>}>
    <ImageField source="src" title="title" />
</ImageInput>

Note that the image upload returns a File object. It is your responsibility to handle it depending on your API behavior. You can for instance encode it in base64, or send it as a multi-part form data. Check this example for base64 encoding data by extending the REST Client.

<ImageInput> also accepts the common input props.

<FileInput>

<FileInput> allows to upload some files using react-dropzone.

FileInput

Previews (actually a simple list of files names) are enabled using <FileField> children, as following:

<FileInput source="files" label="Related files" accept="application/pdf">
    <FileField source="src" title="title" />
</FileInput>

Writing a custom field component for displaying the current value(s) is easy: it’s a standard field.

When receiving new files, FileInput will add a rawFile property to the object passed as the record prop of children. This rawFile is the File instance of the newly added file. This can be useful to display information about size or mimetype inside a custom field.

The FileInput component accepts an options prop into which you can pass all the react-dropzone properties. However, some of the most useful props should be passed directly on the FileInput: maxSize, minSize, multiple.

If the default Dropzone label doesn’t fit with your need, you can pass a placeholder prop to overwrite it. The value can be anything React can render (PropTypes.node):

<FileInput source="files" label="Related files" accept="application/pdf" placeholder={<p>Drop your file here</p>}>
    <ImageField source="src" title="title" />
</FileInput>

Note that the file upload returns a File object. It is your responsibility to handle it depending on your API behavior. You can for instance encode it in base64, or send it as a multi-part form data. Check this example for base64 encoding data by extending the REST Client.

<FileInput> also accepts the common input props.

<NumberInput>

<NumberInput> translates to a HTML <input type="number">. It is necessary for numeric values because of a known React bug, which prevents using the more generic <TextInput> in that case.

import { NumberInput } from 'react-admin';

<NumberInput source="nb_views" />

You can customize the step props (which defaults to “any”):

<NumberInput source="nb_views" step={1} />

<NumberInput> also accepts the common input props.

<RadioButtonGroupInput>

If you want to let the user choose a value among a list of possible values that are always shown (instead of hiding them behind a dropdown list, as in <SelectInput>), <RadioButtonGroupInput> is the right component. Set the choices attribute to determine the options (with id, name tuples):

import { RadioButtonGroupInput } from 'react-admin';

<RadioButtonGroupInput source="category" choices={[
    { id: 'programming', name: 'Programming' },
    { id: 'lifestyle', name: 'Lifestyle' },
    { id: 'photography', name: 'Photography' },
]} />

RadioButtonGroupInput

You can also customize the properties to use for the option name and value, thanks to the optionText and optionValue attributes:

const choices = [
    { _id: 123, full_name: 'Leo Tolstoi', sex: 'M' },
    { _id: 456, full_name: 'Jane Austen', sex: 'F' },
];
<RadioButtonGroupInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText="full_name" optionValue="_id" />

optionText also accepts a function, so you can shape the option text at will:

const choices = [
   { id: 123, first_name: 'Leo', last_name: 'Tolstoi' },
   { id: 456, first_name: 'Jane', last_name: 'Austen' },
];
const optionRenderer = choice => `${choice.first_name} ${choice.last_name}`;
<RadioButtonGroupInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText={optionRenderer} />

optionText also accepts a React Element, that will be cloned and receive the related choice as the record prop. You can use Field components there.

const choices = [
   { id: 123, first_name: 'Leo', last_name: 'Tolstoi' },
   { id: 456, first_name: 'Jane', last_name: 'Austen' },
];
const FullNameField = ({ record }) => <span>{record.first_name} {record.last_name}</span>;
<RadioButtonGroupInput source="gender" choices={choices} optionText={<FullNameField />}/>

The choices are translated by default, so you can use translation identifiers as choices:

const choices = [
   { id: 'M', name: 'myroot.gender.male' },
   { id: 'F', name: 'myroot.gender.female' },
];

However, in some cases (e.g. inside a <ReferenceInput>), you may not want the choice to be translated. In that case, set the translateChoice prop to false.

<RadioButtonGroupInput source="gender" choices={choices} translateChoice={false}/>

Lastly, use the options attribute if you want to override any of Material UI’s <RadioButtonGroup> attributes:

<RadioButtonGroupInput source="category" options={{
    labelPosition: 'right'
}} />

Refer to Material UI RadioGroup documentation for more details.

Tip: If you want to populate the choices attribute with a list of related records, you should decorate <RadioButtonGroupInput> with <ReferenceInput>, and leave the choices empty:

import { RadioButtonGroupInput, ReferenceInput } from 'react-admin';

<ReferenceInput label="Author" source="author_id" reference="authors">
    <RadioButtonGroupInput optionText="last_name" />
</ReferenceInput>

Properties

Prop Required Type Default Description
choices Required Object[] - List of items to show as options
options Optional Object Props to pass to the underlying <RadioButtonGroup> element  
optionText Optional string | Function name Fieldname of record to display in the suggestion item or function which accepts the current record as argument ((record)=> {string})
optionValue Optional string id Fieldname of record containing the value to use as input value
row boolean true Display options in a compact row.  
translateChoice Optional Boolean true Whether the choices should be translated

<RadioButtonGroupInput> also accepts the common input props.

<ReferenceArrayInput>

Use <ReferenceArrayInput> to edit an array of reference values, i.e. to let users choose a list of values (usually foreign keys) from another REST endpoint.

<ReferenceArrayInput> fetches the related resources (using dataProvider.getMany()) as well as possible resources (using dataProvider.getList()) in the reference endpoint.

For instance, if the post object has many tags, a post resource may look like:

{
    id: 1234,
    tag_ids: [1, 23, 4]
}

Then <ReferenceArrayInput> would fetch a list of tag resources from these two calls:

http://myapi.com/tags?id=[1,23,4]
http://myapi.com/tags?page=1&perPage=25

Once it receives the deduplicated reference resources, this component delegates rendering to a subcomponent, to which it passes the possible choices as the choices attribute.

This means you can use <ReferenceArrayInput> with <SelectArrayInput>, or with the component of your choice, provided it supports the choices attribute.

The component expects a source and a reference attributes. For instance, to make the tag_ids for a post editable:

import { ReferenceArrayInput, SelectArrayInput } from 'react-admin';

<ReferenceArrayInput source="tag_ids" reference="tags">
    <SelectArrayInput optionText="name" />
</ReferenceArrayInput>

SelectArrayInput

Note: You must add a <Resource> for the reference resource - react-admin needs it to fetch the reference data. You can omit the list prop in this reference if you want to hide it in the sidebar menu.

<Admin dataProvider={myDataProvider}>
    <Resource name="posts" list={PostList} edit={PostEdit} />
    <Resource name="tags" />
</Admin>

Set the allowEmpty prop when you want to add an empty choice with a value of null in the choices list. Disabling allowEmpty does not mean that the input will be required. If you want to make the input required, you must add a validator as indicated in Validation Documentation. Enabling the allowEmpty props just adds an empty choice (with null value) on top of the options, and makes the value nullable.

import { ReferenceArrayInput, SelectArrayInput } from 'react-admin';

<ReferenceArrayInput source="tag_ids" reference="tags" allowEmpty>
    <SelectArrayInput optionText="name" />
</ReferenceArrayInput>

Tip: allowEmpty is set by default for all Input components children of the <Filter> component

You can tweak how this component fetches the possible values using the perPage, sort, and filter props.

// by default, fetches only the first 25 values. You can extend this limit
// by setting the `perPage` prop.
<ReferenceArrayInput
     source="tag_ids"
     reference="tags"
     perPage={100}>
    <SelectArrayInput optionText="name" />
</ReferenceArrayInput>

// by default, orders the possible values by id desc. You can change this order
// by setting the `sort` prop (an object with `field` and `order` properties).
<ReferenceArrayInput
     source="tag_ids"
     reference="tags"
     sort={{ field: 'title', order: 'ASC' }}>
    <SelectArrayInput optionText="name" />
</ReferenceArrayInput>

// you can filter the query used to populate the possible values. Use the
// `filter` prop for that.
<ReferenceArrayInput
     source="tag_ids"
     reference="tags"
     filter={{ is_published: true }}>
    <SelectArrayInput optionText="name" />
</ReferenceArrayInput>

<ReferenceArrayInput> also accepts the common input props.

<ReferenceInput>

Use <ReferenceInput> for foreign-key values, for instance, to edit the post_id of a comment resource. This component fetches the related record (using dataProvider.getMany()) as well as possible choices (using dataProvider.getList() in the reference resource), then delegates rendering to a subcomponent, to which it passes the possible choices as the choices attribute.

This means you can use <ReferenceInput> with any of <SelectInput>, <AutocompleteInput>, or <RadioButtonGroupInput>, or even with the component of your choice, provided it supports the choices attribute.

The component expects a source and a reference attributes. For instance, to make the post_id for a comment editable:

import { ReferenceInput, SelectInput } from 'react-admin';

<ReferenceInput label="Post" source="post_id" reference="posts">
    <SelectInput optionText="title" />
</ReferenceInput>

ReferenceInput

Note: You must add a <Resource> for the reference resource - react-admin needs it to fetch the reference data. You can omit the list prop in this reference if you want to hide it in the sidebar menu.

<Admin dataProvider={myDataProvider}>
    <Resource name="comments" list={CommentList} />
    <Resource name="posts" />
</Admin>

Tip: Why does <ReferenceInput> use the GET_MANY verb with a single value [id] instead of GET_ONE to fetch the record for the current value? Because when there are many <ReferenceInput> for the same resource in a form (for instance when inside an <ArrayInput>), react-admin aggregates the calls to GET_MANY into a single one with [id1, id2, ...)]. This speeds up the UI and avoids hitting the API too much.

Set the allowEmpty prop when you want to add an empty choice with a value of null in the choices list. Disabling allowEmpty does not mean that the input will be required. If you want to make the input required, you must add a validator as indicated in Validation Documentation. Enabling the allowEmpty props just adds an empty choice (with null value) on top of the options, and makes the value nullable.

import { ReferenceInput, SelectInput } from 'react-admin';

<ReferenceInput label="Post" source="post_id" reference="posts" allowEmpty>
    <SelectInput optionText="title" />
</ReferenceInput>

Tip: allowEmpty is set by default for all Input components children of the <Filter> component:

const CommentFilter = (props) => (
    <Filter {...props}>
        <ReferenceInput label="Post" source="post_id" reference="posts"> // no need for allowEmpty
            <SelectInput optionText="title" />
        </ReferenceInput>
    </Filter>
);

You can tweak how this component fetches the possible values using the perPage, sort, and filter props.

// by default, fetches only the first 25 values. You can extend this limit
// by setting the `perPage` prop.
<ReferenceInput
     source="post_id"
     reference="posts"
     perPage={100}>
    <SelectInput optionText="title" />
</ReferenceInput>

// by default, orders the possible values by id desc. You can change this order
// by setting the `sort` prop (an object with `field` and `order` properties).
<ReferenceInput
     source="post_id"
     reference="posts"
     sort={{ field: 'title', order: 'ASC' }}>
    <SelectInput optionText="title" />
</ReferenceInput>

// you can filter the query used to populate the possible values. Use the
// `filter` prop for that.
<ReferenceInput
     source="post_id"
     reference="posts"
     filter={{ is_published: true }}>
    <SelectInput optionText="title" />
</ReferenceInput>

The child component may further filter results (that’s the case, for instance, for <AutocompleteInput>). ReferenceInput passes a setFilter function as prop to its child component. It uses the value to create a filter for the query - by default { q: [searchText] }. You can customize the mapping searchText => searchQuery by setting a custom filterToQuery function prop:

<ReferenceInput
     source="post_id"
     reference="posts"
     filterToQuery={searchText => ({ title: searchText })}>
    <SelectInput optionText="title" />
</ReferenceInput>

The child component receives the following props from <ReferenceInput>:

  • loading: whether the request for possible values is loading or not
  • filter: the current filter of the request for possible values. Defaults to {}.
  • pagination: the current pagination of the request for possible values. Defaults to { page: 1, perPage: 25 }.
  • sort: the current sorting of the request for possible values. Defaults to { field: 'id', order: 'DESC' }.
  • error: the error message if the form validation failed for that input
  • warning: the warning message if the form validation failed for that input
  • onChange: function to call when the value changes
  • setFilter: function to call to update the filter of the request for possible values
  • setPagination: : function to call to update the pagination of the request for possible values
  • setSort: function to call to update the sorting of the request for possible values

Properties

Prop Required Type Default Description
allowEmpty Optional Boolean false If true, add an empty item to the list of choices to allow for empty value
filter Optional Object {} Permanent filters to use for getting the suggestion list
filterToQuery Optional Function string => Object searchText => ({ q: [searchText] }) How to transform the searchText (passed e.g. by an <AutocompleteArrayInput>) into a parameter for the data provider
perPage Optional number 25 Number of suggestions to show
reference Required String ’’ Name of the reference resource, e.g. ‘posts’.
sort Optional { field: String, order: 'ASC' | 'DESC' } { field: 'id', order: 'DESC' } How to order the list of suggestions

<ReferenceInput> also accepts the common input props.

<RichTextInput>

<RichTextInput> is the ideal component if you want to allow your users to edit some HTML contents. It is powered by Quill.

Note: Due to its size, <RichTextInput> is not bundled by default with react-admin. You must install it first, using npm:

npm install ra-input-rich-text

Then use it as a normal input component:

import RichTextInput from 'ra-input-rich-text';

<RichTextInput source="body" />

RichTextInput

You can customize the rich text editor toolbar using the toolbar attribute, as described on the Quill official toolbar documentation.

<RichTextInput source="body" toolbar={[ ['bold', 'italic', 'underline', 'link'] ]} />

If you need more customization, you can access the quill object through the configureQuill callback that will be called just after its initialization.

const configureQuill = quill => quill.getModule('toolbar').addHandler('bold', function (value) {
    this.quill.format('bold', value)
});

// ...

<RichTextInput source="text" configureQuill={configureQuill}/>

<RichTextInput> also accepts the common input props.

<SelectInput>

To let users choose a value in a list using a dropdown, use <SelectInput>. It renders using Material ui’s <Select>. Set the choices attribute to determine the options (with id, name tuples):

import { SelectInput } from 'react-admin';

<SelectInput source="category" choices={[
    { id: 'programming', name: 'Programming' },
    { id: 'lifestyle', name: 'Lifestyle' },
    { id: 'photography', name: 'Photography' },
]} />

SelectInput

You can also customize the properties to use for the option name and value, thanks to the optionText and optionValue attributes:

const choices = [
    { _id: 123, full_name: 'Leo Tolstoi', sex: 'M' },
    { _id: 456, full_name: 'Jane Austen', sex: 'F' },
];
<SelectInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText="full_name" optionValue="_id" />

optionText also accepts a function, so you can shape the option text at will:

const choices = [
   { id: 123, first_name: 'Leo', last_name: 'Tolstoi' },
   { id: 456, first_name: 'Jane', last_name: 'Austen' },
];
const optionRenderer = choice => `${choice.first_name} ${choice.last_name}`;
<SelectInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText={optionRenderer} />

optionText also accepts a React Element, that will be cloned and receive the related choice as the record prop. You can use Field components there.

const choices = [
   { id: 123, first_name: 'Leo', last_name: 'Tolstoi' },
   { id: 456, first_name: 'Jane', last_name: 'Austen' },
];
const FullNameField = ({ record }) => <span>{record.first_name} {record.last_name}</span>;
<SelectInput source="gender" choices={choices} optionText={<FullNameField />}/>

Enabling the allowEmpty props adds an empty choice (with a default null value, which you can overwrite with the emptyValue prop) on top of the options, and makes the value nullable. You can furthermore customize the MenuItem for the empty choice by using the emptyText prop, which can receive either a string or a React Element, which doesn’t receive any props.

<SelectInput source="category" allowEmpty emptyValue="" choices={[
    { id: 'programming', name: 'Programming' },
    { id: 'lifestyle', name: 'Lifestyle' },
    { id: 'photography', name: 'Photography' },
]} />

The choices are translated by default, so you can use translation identifiers as choices:

const choices = [
   { id: 'M', name: 'myroot.gender.male' },
   { id: 'F', name: 'myroot.gender.female' },
];

However, in some cases, you may not want the choice to be translated. In that case, set the translateChoice prop to false.

<SelectInput source="gender" choices={choices} translateChoice={false}/>

Note that translateChoice is set to false when <SelectInput> is a child of <ReferenceInput>.

Lastly, use the options attribute if you want to override any of Material UI’s <SelectField> attributes:

<SelectInput source="category" options={{
    maxHeight: 200
}} />

Refer to Material UI Select documentation for more details.

Tip: If you want to populate the choices attribute with a list of related records, you should decorate <SelectInput> with <ReferenceInput>, and leave the choices empty:

import { SelectInput, ReferenceInput } from 'react-admin';

<ReferenceInput label="Author" source="author_id" reference="authors">
    <SelectInput optionText="last_name" />
</ReferenceInput>

If, instead of showing choices as a dropdown list, you prefer to display them as a list of radio buttons, try the <RadioButtonGroupInput>. And if the list is too big, prefer the <AutocompleteInput>.

You can make the SelectInput component resettable using the resettable prop. This will add a reset button which will be displayed only when the field has a value.

resettable SelectInput

You can set disabled values by setting the disabled property of one item:

const choices = [
    { _id: 123, full_name: 'Leo Tolstoi', sex: 'M' },
    { _id: 456, full_name: 'Jane Austen', sex: 'F' },
    { _id: 1, full_name: 'System Administrator', sex: 'F', disabled: true },
];
<SelectInput source="author_id" choices={choices} optionText="full_name" optionValue="_id" />

You can use a custom field name by setting disableValue prop:

const choices = [
    { _id: 123, full_name: 'Leo Tolstoi', sex: 'M' },
    { _id: 456, full_name: 'Jane Austen', sex: 'F' },
    { _id: 987, full_name: 'Jack Harden', sex: 'M', not_available: true },
];
<SelectInput source="contact_id" choices={choices} optionText="full_name" optionValue="_id" disableValue="not_available" />

Properties

Prop Required Type Default Description
allowEmpty Optional Boolean false If true, the first option is an empty one
choices Required Object[] - List of items to show as options
emptyText Optional string ’’ The text to display for the empty option
options Optional Object Props to pass to the underlying <SelectInput> element  
optionText Optional string | Function name Fieldname of record to display in the suggestion item or function which accepts the current record as argument ((record)=> {string})
optionValue Optional string id Fieldname of record containing the value to use as input value
resettable Optional Boolean false If true, display a button to reset the changes in this input value
translateChoice Optional Boolean true Whether the choices should be translated

<SelectInput> also accepts the common input props.

<SelectArrayInput>

To let users choose several values in a list using a dropdown, use <SelectArrayInput>. It renders using Material ui’s <Select>. Set the choices attribute to determine the options (with id, name tuples):

import { SelectArrayInput } from 'react-admin';

<SelectArrayInput label="Tags" source="categories" choices={[
    { id: 'music', name: 'Music' },
    { id: 'photography', name: 'Photo' },
    { id: 'programming', name: 'Code' },
    { id: 'tech', name: 'Technology' },
    { id: 'sport', name: 'Sport' },
]} />

SelectArrayInput

You can also customize the properties to use for the option name and value, thanks to the optionText and optionValue attributes.

const choices = [
   { _id: '1', name: 'Book', plural_name: 'Books' },
   { _id: '2', name: 'Video', plural_name: 'Videos' },
   { _id: '3', name: 'Audio', plural_name: 'Audios' },
];
<SelectArrayInput source="categories" choices={choices} optionText="plural_name" optionValue="_id" />

optionText also accepts a function, so you can shape the option text at will:

const choices = [
   { id: '1', name: 'Book', quantity: 23 },
   { id: '2', name: 'Video', quantity: 56 },
   { id: '3', name: 'Audio', quantity: 12 },
];
const optionRenderer = choice => `${choice.name} (${choice.quantity})`;
<SelectArrayInput source="categories" choices={choices} optionText={optionRenderer} />

The choices are translated by default, so you can use translation identifiers as choices:

const choices = [
   { id: 'books', name: 'myroot.category.books' },
   { id: 'sport', name: 'myroot.category.sport' },
];

Lastly, use the options attribute if you want to override any of the <Select> attributes:

<SelectArrayInput source="category" options={{ fullWidth: true }} />

Refer to the Select documentation for more details.

The SelectArrayInput component cannot be used inside a ReferenceInput but can be used inside a ReferenceArrayInput.

import React from 'react';
import {
    ChipField,
    Create,
    DateInput,
    ReferenceArrayInput,
    SelectArrayInput,
    TextInput,
} from 'react-admin';

export const PostCreate = props => (
    <Create {...props}>
        <SimpleForm>
            <TextInput source="title" />
            <TextInput multiline source="body" />
            <DateInput source="published_at" />

            <ReferenceArrayInput reference="tags" source="tags">
                <SelectArrayInput>
                    <ChipField source="name" />
                </SelectArrayInput>
            </ReferenceArrayInput>
        </SimpleForm>
    </Create>
);

Tip: As it does not provide autocompletion, the SelectArrayInput might not be suited when the referenced resource has a lot of items.

<SelectArrayInput> also accepts the common input props.

<TextInput>

<TextInput> is the most common input. It is used for texts, emails, URL or passwords. In translates to an HTML <input> tag.

import { TextInput } from 'react-admin';

<TextInput source="title" />

TextInput

You can choose a specific input type using the type attribute, for instance text (the default), email, url, or password:

<TextInput label="Email Address" source="email" type="email" />

You can make the TextInput expandable using the multiline prop for multiline text values. It renders as an auto expandable textarea.

<TextInput multiline source="body" />

You can make the TextInput component resettable using the resettable prop. This will add a reset button which will be displayed only when the field has a value and is focused.

import { TextInput } from 'react-admin';

<TextInput source="title" resettable />

resettable TextInput

Warning: Do not use type="number", or you’ll receive a string as value (this is a known React bug). Instead, use <NumberInput>.

Properties

Prop Required Type Default Description
resettable Optional Boolean false If true, display a button to reset the changes in this input value
type Optional string text Type attribute passed to the <input> element

<TextInput> also accepts the common input props.

Transforming Input Value to/from Record

The data format returned by the input component may not be what your API desires. Since React-admin uses react-final-form, we can use its parse() and format() functions to transform the input value when saving to and loading from the record.

Mnemonic for the two functions:

  • parse(): input -> record
  • format(): record -> input

Say the user would like to input values of 0-100 to a percentage field but your API (hence record) expects 0-1.0. You can use simple parse() and format() functions to archive the transform:

<NumberInput source="percent" format={v => v*100} parse={v => v/100} label="Formatted number" />

<DateInput> stores and returns a string. If you would like to store a JavaScript Date object in your record instead:

const dateFormatter = v => {
  // v is a `Date` object
  if (!(v instanceof Date) || isNaN(v)) return;
  const pad = '00';
  const yy = v.getFullYear().toString();
  const mm = (v.getMonth() + 1).toString();
  const dd = v.getDate().toString();
  return `${yy}-${(pad + mm).slice(-2)}-${(pad + dd).slice(-2)}`;
};

const dateParser = v => {
  // v is a string of "YYYY-MM-DD" format
  const match = /(\d{4})-(\d{2})-(\d{2})/.exec(v);
  if (match === null) return;
  const d = new Date(match[1], parseInt(match[2], 10) - 1, match[3]);
  if (isNaN(d)) return;
  return d;
};

<DateInput source="isodate" format={dateFormatter} parse={dateParser} />

Third-Party Components

You can find components for react-admin in third-party repositories.

Writing Your Own Input Component

If you need a more specific input type, you can write it directly in React. You’ll have to rely on react-final-form’s <Field> component, or its useField hook, so as to handle the value update cycle.

For instance, let’s write a component to edit the latitude and longitude of the current record:

// in LatLongInput.js
import { Field } from 'react-final-form';
const LatLngInput = () => (
    <span>
        <Field name="lat" component="input" type="number" placeholder="latitude" />
        &nbsp;
        <Field name="lng" component="input" type="number" placeholder="longitude" />
    </span>
);
export default LatLngInput;

// in ItemEdit.js
const ItemEdit = (props) => (
    <Edit {...props}>
        <SimpleForm>
            <LatLngInput />
        </SimpleForm>
    </Edit>
);

LatLngInput takes no props, because the <Field> component can access the current record via the form context. The name prop serves as a selector for the record property to edit. All the props passed to Field except name and component are passed to the child component (an <input> in that example). Executing this component will render roughly the following code:

<span>
    <input type="number" placeholder="latitude" value={record.lat} />
    <input type="number" placeholder="longitude" value={record.lng} />
</span>

Tip: React-final-form’s <Field> component supports dot notation in the name prop, to allow binding to nested values:

const LatLongInput = () => (
    <span>
        <Field name="position.lat" component="input" type="number" placeholder="latitude" />
        &nbsp;
        <Field name="position.lng" component="input" type="number" placeholder="longitude" />
    </span>
);

This component lacks a label. React-admin provides the <Labeled> component for that:

// in LatLongInput.js
import { Field } from 'react-final-form';
import { Labeled } from 'react-admin';

const LatLngInput = () => (
    <Labeled label="position">
        <span>
            <Field name="lat" component="input" type="number" placeholder="latitude" />
            &nbsp;
            <Field name="lng" component="input" type="number" placeholder="longitude" />
        </span>
    </Labeled>
);
export default LatLngInput;

Now the component will render with a label:

<label>Position</label>
<span>
    <input type="number" placeholder="longitude" value={record.lat} />
    <input type="number" placeholder="longitude" value={record.lng} />
</span>

Instead of HTML input elements, you can use a material-ui component like TextField. To bind material-ui components to the form values, use the useField() hook:

// in LatLongInput.js
import TextField from '@material-ui/core/TextField';
import { useField } from 'react-final-form';

const BoundedTextField = ({ name, label }) => {
    const { 
        input: { onChange },
        meta: { touched, error }
    } = useField(name);
    return (
        <TextField
            name={name}
            label={label}
            onChange={onChange}
            error={!!(touched && error)}
            helperText={touched && error}
        />
    );
};
const LatLngInput = () => (
    <span>
        <BoundedTextField name="lat" label="latitude" />
        &nbsp;
        <BoundedTextField name="lng" label="longitude" />
    </span>
);

Tip: Material-ui’s <TextField> component already includes a label, so you don’t need to use <Labeled> in this case.

useField() returns two values: input and meta. To learn more about these props, please refer to the useField() hook documentation in the react-final-form website.

Instead of HTML input elements or material-ui components, you can use react-admin input components, like <NumberInput> for instance. React-admin components already use useField(), and already include a label, so you don’t need either useField() or <Labeled> when using them:

// in LatLongInput.js
import { NumberInput } from 'react-admin';
const LatLngInput = () => (
    <span>
        <NumberInput source="lat" label="latitude" />
        &nbsp;
        <NumberInput source="lng" label="longitude" />
    </span>
);
export default LatLngInput;

useInput() Hook

React-admin adds functionality to react-final-form:

  • handling of custom event emitters like onChange,
  • support for an array of validators,
  • detection of required fields to add an asterisk to the field label.

So internally, react-admin components use another hook, which wraps react-final-form’s useField() hook. It’s called useInput() ; use it instead of useField() to create form inputs that have the exact same API as react-admin Input components:

// in LatLongInput.js
import TextField from '@material-ui/core/TextField';
import { useInput, required } from 'react-admin';

const BoundedTextField = props => {
    const { 
        input: { name, onChange },
        meta: { touched, error },
        isRequired
    } = useInput(props);
    return (
        <TextField
            name={name}
            label={props.label}
            onChange={onChange}
            error={!!(touched && error)}
            helperText={touched && error}
            required={isRequired}
        />
    );
};
const LatLngInput = () => (
    <span>
        <BoundedTextField source="lat" label="latitude" validate={[required()]} />
        &nbsp;
        <BoundedTextField source="lng" label="longitude" validate={[required()]} />
    </span>
);

Here is another example, this time using a material-ui SelectField component:

// in SexInput.js
import SelectField from '@material-ui/core/SelectField';
import MenuItem from '@material-ui/core/MenuItem';
import { useInput } from 'react-admin';

const SexInput = () => {
    const { input, meta: { touched, error } } = useInput(props)
    return (
        <SelectField
            floatingLabelText="Sex"
            errorText={touched && error}
            {...input}
        >
            <MenuItem value="M" primaryText="Male" />
            <MenuItem value="F" primaryText="Female" />
        </SelectField>
    );
};
export default SexInput;

Tip: useInput accepts all arguments that you can pass to useField. That means that components using useInput accept props like format and parse, to convert values from the form to the input, and vice-versa:

const parse = value => // ...
const format = value => // ...

const PersonEdit = props => (
    <Edit {...props}>
        <SimpleForm>
            <SexInput source="sex"
                format={formValue => formValue === 0 ? 'M' : 'F'}
                parse={inputValue => inputValue === 'M' ? 0 : 1}
            />
        </SimpleForm>
    </Edit>
)

Linking Two Inputs

Edition forms often contain linked inputs, e.g. country and city (the choices of the latter depending on the value of the former).

React-admin relies on react-final-form, so you can grab the current form values using react-final-form useFormState hook. Alternatively, you can use the react-admin <FormDataConsumer> component, which grabs the form values, and passes them to a child function.

This facilitates the implementation of linked inputs:

import { FormDataConsumer } from 'react-admin';

const OrderEdit = (props) => (
    <Edit {...props}>
        <SimpleForm>
            <SelectInput source="country" choices={countries} />
            <FormDataConsumer>
                {({ formData, ...rest }) =>
                     <SelectInput
                         source="city"
                         choices={getCitiesFor(formData.country)}
                         {...rest}
                     />
                }
            </FormDataConsumer>
        </SimpleForm>
    </Edit>
);

Tip: When using a FormDataConsumer inside an ArrayInput, the FormDataConsumer will provide three additional properties to its children function:

  • scopedFormData: an object containing the current values of the currently rendered item from the ArrayInput
  • getSource: a function which will translate the source into a valid one for the ArrayInput

Would you need to update an input when another one changes, use the useForm hook from react-final-form. For example, a country input that resets a city input on change.

import React, { Fragment } from 'react';
import { useForm } from 'react-final-form';

const OrderOrigin = ({ formData, ...rest }) => {
    const form = useForm();

    return (
        <Fragment>
            <SelectInput
                source="country"
                choices={countries}
                onChange={value => form.change('city', null)}
                {...rest}
            />
            <SelectInput
                source="city"
                choices={getCitiesFor(formData.country)}
                {...rest}
            />
        </Fragment>
    );
};

const OrderEdit = (props) => (
    <Edit {...props}>
        <SimpleForm>
            <FormDataConsumer>
                {formDataProps => (
                    <OrderOrigin {...formDataProps} />
                )}
            </FormDataConsumer>
        </SimpleForm>
    </Edit>
);

And here is an example usage for getSource inside <ArrayInput>:

import { FormDataConsumer } from 'react-admin';

const PostEdit = (props) => (
    <Edit {...props}>
        <SimpleForm>
            <ArrayInput source="authors">
                <SimpleFormIterator>
                    <TextInput source="name" />

                    <FormDataConsumer>
                        {({
                            formData, // The whole form data
                            scopedFormData, // The data for this item of the ArrayInput
                            getSource, // A function to get the valid source inside an ArrayInput
                            ...rest,
                        }) =>
                            scopedFormData.name ? (
                                <SelectInput
                                    source={getSource('role')} // Will translate to "authors[0].role"
                                    choices={['main', 'coauthor']}
                                    {...rest}
                                />
                            ) : null
                        }
                    </FormDataConsumer>
                </SimpleFormIterator>
            </ArrayInput>
        </SimpleForm>
    </Edit>
);

Hiding Inputs Based On Other Inputs

You may want to display or hide inputs base on the value of another input - for instance, show an email input only if the hasEmail boolean input is ticked to true.

For such cases, you can use the approach described above, using the <FormDataConsumer> component.

import { FormDataConsumer } from 'react-admin';

 const PostEdit = (props) => (
     <Edit {...props}>
         <SimpleForm>
             <BooleanInput source="hasEmail" />
             <FormDataConsumer>
                 {({ formData, ...rest }) => formData.hasEmail &&
                      <TextInput source="email" {...rest} />
                 }
             </FormDataConsumer>
         </SimpleForm>
     </Edit>
 );

Tip: When using a FormDataConsumer you can define subscription prop to pass to the react-final-form

import { FormDataConsumer } from 'react-admin';

 const PostEdit = (props) => (
     <Edit {...props}>
         <SimpleForm>
             <BooleanInput source="hasEmail" />
             <FormDataConsumer subscription={{ values: true }}>
                 {({ formData, ...rest }) => formData.hasEmail &&
                      <TextInput source="email" {...rest} />
                 }
             </FormDataConsumer>
         </SimpleForm>
     </Edit>
 );